This Issue

Against the Odds

A Radical Solution

Exercise your option to reduce your risk of cancer

Q & A

Signs & Symptoms

Understanding the jargon of cancer

Oncologist a doctor who specializes in the treatment of cancer

Tumor/Neoplasm an abnormal mass of tissue caused by an over-production of cells

Benign non-cancerous; a tumor that does not spread and is rarely life-threatening

Malignant cancerous; a tumor that can invade nearby organs and spread to other parts of the body; may be life-threatening

Primary cancer the original tumor named for the part of the body in which cancer starts

In situ the cancer is confined to its original site

Invasive the cancer has grown into nearby tissues

Metastasis the cancer has spread to other parts of the body; the new tumor is a metastatic tumor of the primary cancer. For example, breast cancer that has spread to the lungs is called metastatic breast cancer, not lung cancer

Staging defines the extent or severity of cancer using Roman numerals I to IV; Stage I is the least extensive, Stage IV the most extensive

Understanding the jargon of cancer

Invaluable inspection

Screening is one of the most effective ways to prevent cancer or find it in its early stage when treatment is more successful.

Cancer

Starting age*

Test*


Breast
40
Mammogram

Prostate
50
PSA

Colorectal
50
Colonoscopy

Cervical
21
Pap test

*Ask your doctor when to start screening and the most appropriate test.

Invaluable inspection

Celebrate National Minority
Cancer Awareness Week!

Health fair
April 10, 1:30 pm
The Power to Make a Difference – AARP
Twelfth Baptist Church, 150 Warren Street, Roxbury

Health education/workshop
April 14, 11:00 am to 2:00 pm
Annual Alternative & Complementary Health and Wellness Fair
UMass Boston, 100 Morrissey Blvd., Dorchester

April 18 - April 30
The Choice is Yours - Boston Public Library Cancer Awareness Display
• Roslindale Branch Library • Grove Hall Branch Library
• South End Branch Library • Parker Hill Library

April 23, 12:00 to 1:00 pm
Our Time and Space
Charles Street AME Church, 551 Warren Street, Roxbury

May 17, 10:30 am
Seniors on the Move – Nutrition – Community Servings
Roxbury YMCA, 285 Martin Luther King Blvd.

Events are sponsored by
Dana Farber/Harvard Cancer Center.
Call 617-632-3244 for more information.
Celebrate National Minority Cancer Awareness Week!

A colorful way to good health

Reduce your odds

View the full issue
Quick Links
[x close]

[ Printable View ]

Signs & Symptoms

  • Unintended weight loss

  • Changes in bowel or bladder habits, such as constipation or frequency of urination

  • Persistent cough

  • Hoarseness

  • Lump that can be felt under
    the skin

  • Fatigue

  • Fever
  • Change in skin color – yellowing, darkening or reddening

  • Sores that do not heal

  • Changes to existing moles

  • Difficulty swallowing

  • Persistent indigestion

  • Unusual bleeding or discharge

  • Pain

A colorful way to
good health


Research has found that the trick to healthy eating is variety — no single antioxidant can achieve optimal protection of health. More





There are no
guarantees you won’t get cancer … but you can reduce your odds.
More



Against the odds

Augusta Williams

Thanks to significant medical advances over the years, Americans diagnosed with cancer are living longer with the once dreaded disease.

Say this about Augusta Williams: she is fearless.

Like the time she faced down a robber who invaded the beauty parlor where she stopped to have her hair done.

Williams is equally combative when it comes to her health. Diagnosed with bone cancer in 1984 and breast cancer four years later, Williams plans to celebrate her 70th birthday — and almost 30 years of survival — next year in Australia. More

A radical solution
As a registered dietitian at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute (DFCI), Stacy Kennedy has heard it all before.

She knows most people are busy. She knows processed foods are convenient and cheaper. But she also knows that a healthy diet of fruits and vegetables can help prevent cancer and ultimately, save lives. More


Exercise your option to reduce your risk of cancer

Go ahead. Call five people in the community to ask if anyone they know has cancer. Odds are good you’ll hear “yes” probably more than once. More

Send This Page To A Friend